Why The Attempt To Create A Ten Hour Day Got Failed? Mind Blowing Facts



You probably knew all that there are 12 months in a year, 4 weeks in a month, 7 days in a week and 24 hours in a day. There are 60 minutes in an hour and 60 seconds in a minute. As you can follow this every day. Instead of there being a base unit with other units simply being some power of ten larger or smaller (kilometres, centimetres, to further our example), we end up with 7s and 24s and 60s and all sorts of other numbers which do not match the number of fingers we have.

Still, the question bothers everyone’s mind that why our days have two 12-hour halves or why our hours have 60 minutes of 60 seconds each. The importance of the number 12 is typically attributed either to the fact that it equals the number of lunar cycles in a year or the number of finger joints on each hand. But neither of those two measures are as important as they used to be. So, why haven’t we switched to decimal time? The answer is random people don’t really care about the math behind the clock.

But the hidden facts are interesting to know. French researchers tried to reform the minutes and hours, by using something which is now called “French Revolutionary Time” or “French Republican Time,” depending on which source you go by.It was based on a simple idea that – ten hour days, with each hour consisting of 100 minutes, and each new minute made up of 100 seconds. This base 10 system became viral among the clock researchers on November 24, 1793. 

As one can see clearly that the two centre rings are base 100 and 10 respectively from the centre out, whereas the traditional time is measured on the outside rings. The arm of the clock pointing at 8 o’clock in the new system is also pointing to a few minutes before 7:15 PM in the old system. Then the seven days of the week were replaced by a ten-day week. Each month included 30 days now, and each month includes 3 weeks, no less no more. There were still 12 months, in order to make the math work out correctly, but each month was renamed to reflect the seasons as experienced by someone in Paris. Five or six (on leap years) celebratory days came at the end of the year, bringing us to the same 365 days in the current calendar.

There were still 12 months, in order to make the math work out correctly, but each month was renamed to reflect the seasons as experienced by someone in Paris. Five or six (on leap years) celebratory days came at the end of the year, bringing us to the same 365 days in the current calendar.

According to Mental Floss further notes, unlike weights and measures, time has a few practical parameters. The base 12 system was not appropriate and also the clocks based on it didn’t need to be replaced, which sounds like a silly reason but the cost of changing over every single clock was remarkable. Unfortunately, with the lack of proper results, the new government gave up the effort in the end.

Now You Can Get the Latest Buzz On Your Phone! Download the PagalParrot Mobile App For Android



Source link

What's Your Reaction?
Angry Angry
0
Angry
Fail Fail
0
Fail
Geeky Geeky
0
Geeky
Lol Lol
0
Lol
Love Love
0
Love
OMG OMG
0
OMG
Scary Scary
0
Scary
Win Win
0
Win
WTF WTF
0
WTF

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Why The Attempt To Create A Ten Hour Day Got Failed? Mind Blowing Facts

log in

Don't have an account?
sign up

reset password

Back to
log in

sign up

Back to
log in